Electrolytes for chicks?

by Janet
(No. Calif )

I have 6, 15 day old chicks. I have been putting electrolytes in their water and offering plain water as well.

How long should I provide them with the medicated water? They drink both, but seem to prefer the one with electrolytes.

Comments for Electrolytes for chicks?

Click here to add your own comments

When to stop electrolytes.
by: Cath

Hi Janet,

I don't give my chicks electrolytes unless they're weak - electrolytes aren't medicated, they're a kind of vitamin and mineral boost with salt as the main ingredient. You can read more about them, here - complete with a recipe for a home made electrolyte drink.

I would stop giving them electrolytes now, unless there's some reason they need them. For example, to deal with some kind of stress such as heat, or if they had a difficult hatch.

Otherwise, fresh water is all they need.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Questions and Answers.

Baby chick smells sweet, is it a problem?

by Erin
(Albuquerque, NM)

Hello,

One of my baby chicks has a smell to her. The smell is sweet and not horrible but not good either.

The best I can describe it, is like sweet corn. The other 8 don't have a smell. She eats/ drinks well and behaves well. Help me!

Thank you!

Comments for Baby chick smells sweet, is it a problem?

Click here to add your own comments


by: Cath

Hi Erin,

It's hard to tell, but it may be she has a yeast infection. If you can get a look inside her beak you might be able to see - it should be clear, but sometimes with a yeast infection you can see a kind of bubbly mess inside the mouth.

I'd suggest a few drops of apple cider vinegar in her water at the rate of about a tablespoon of ACV to a litre (US quart) of water.

Some people would say to give an anti-fungal medication, but I'd start with ACV - I don't like medicating chicks unless it proves absolutely necessary.

And if she's otherwise ok, I don't think there's a need to worry.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Questions and Answers.

Wry neck - preparing for the worst.

by Haley Durnin
(Tacoma, Washington, USA)

My name is Haley, I am 21 and finally have been able to have my very own chickens. I have a beautiful flock of 4, one of whom is my 3 week old silkie, Shilo. I believe she has wry neck, as of 24 hours ago. I have been treating her, and I am trying to keep my hopes up high.

I just watched your video on the sudden death of your roo, and I just wanted to say thank you.

Thank you for having as much sympathy in death for these chickens in death as you would an other living creature.

I got Shilo at 3 days old, and in just that short span of time she has become my baby. She was the first chick I got before her sibling came a few hours later.

I'm heartbroken about the whole situation, and I know I may have to prepare myself for the eventuality that she may not make it.

But seeing somebody have the same emotion I do towards her to their chickens makes me feel so much better.

I already got the "just get another chick". And not everybody realizes that can tear your heart right open.

I just wanted to say thank you. You have helped me tremendously with this site and all the information. I won't give up on my little girl.

Comments for Wry neck - preparing for the worst.

Click here to add your own comments

Thank you!
by: Cath

Oh Haley, my heart goes out to you! How lovely that you care for your little chick so much. She is lucky to have a caring home.

Wry neck is very treatable. There's an article about it, here. Vitamin 'E' is the answer.

I'm so glad my site has helped you. It's lovely of you to take the time to let me know, and it makes my work worthwhile.

Keeping chickens has many joys and, as with all living things, some sadnesses. The important thing is we revel in the joys and allow ourselves to grieve in the sadness when we lose a chicken.

Thank you again, and I wish you and your flock everything good for the future. xoxo

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Questions and Answers.

Brooder box, stage 2

by Karen Ashley
(Atlanta, TX)

I saw the great article about the stage 1 brooder box. There were suggestions with what to use for the box as well as what to put in it.

I was hoping to find an article about the stage 2 brooder box but I have searched the site and haven't found much on that topic. There is so much great information on this site, that it is possible I just missed it.

Please give some suggestions for the stage 2 brooder box. I don't know how tall the walls need to be. I don't want to risk my little peepers escaping or injuring themselves if/ when they try to go over the top.

Any help you can provide will be much appreciated.

Comments for Brooder box, stage 2

Click here to add your own comments

Larger brooder box.
by: Cath

Hi Karen,

Thank you for your kind comments about my website.

You're right! I have not followed up properly the information about what I do when chicks outgrow the first stage brooder. Thank you so much for drawing this to my attention!

I do have information about what I do next, but it's not in an obvious place. It's here, in my article about what to do with chickens in April and it includes a short video of my chicks in their new brooder.

This is on my to-do list now - again, thank you for raising it.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Questions and Answers.

When can chick go outside?

by Kerry
(England )

We got chicks from an incubation programme at the nursery I work at and we have kept 3 of the chicks.

They are now 5 weeks old.

When are they ready to go outside as they are too big in the inside box we have them in.

They are well feathered.

Comments for When can chick go outside?

Click here to add your own comments

Chicks outside - tips for their care.
by: Cath

Hi Kerry,

This will depend on various issues such as the weather, the breed of chick, the size, whether they're being mixed in with an existing flock, their feathering and whether the coop they're going into is warm enough.

I have an article about this very thing, at this link.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Questions and Answers.

Can you hold a baby chick too much?

I had a 4wk old baby chick and she passed away after only having her 1 night. I was just wondering if me holding her constantly could have been the cause of her passing?

Comments for Can you hold a baby chick too much?

Click here to add your own comments

Handling baby chicks.
by: Cath

Hi there,

You must not blame yourself for this. It's very sad, and I feel for you, but all we can do is learn from our hard experiences.

Chicks can die for all kinds of reasons, from overheating to being too cold, to getting disease from other birds, and many unexplained reasons.

Like adult hens, they just sometimes die an unexplained death.

Can you hold baby chicks too much? Well, you should always make sure your hands are clean when you do, so as not to transmit any bacteria. It's better not to handle chicks until they're at least 3 or 4 days old - before this they need to get a lot of sleep! and it's better to handle them gently, for just a few minutes at a time. If you want more contact - which is helpful for making your flock friendly - handle for short periods several times a day rather than one long session.

I find it's better to sit on the floor, and allow the chicks to come to me. I have a large brooder (made from a puppy pen) so I can actually get in and sit with them while they go about their business.

They're naturally inquisitive, and if you have some food or treats in your hand, they'll soon come over to look.

I hope that helps.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Questions and Answers.

Helping weak chicks

by Wendy Martin
(Ponce de leon fl)

I have purchased several different chicks this year, and one breed in particular seems to be weak. They are Vorworks.

My guess is the parent stock has issues or is unfortunately raised on gmo’s.

How can I help them gain strength? I have lost 4 over a 6 week period.

Comments for Helping weak chicks

Click here to add your own comments

Helping weak chicks
by: Cath

Hi Wendy,

Vorwerks are quite a rare breed of chicken, and I don't have any experience of them personally. I suspect you're right when you say the parent stock may have had issues - it's not uncommon for breeders to over-breed a line of stock, particularly with rare breeds.

For any weak chick, I'd suggest some hard-boiled egg crumbled up and some electrolytes. I have an article about making inexpensive electrolytes at home, here.

It does sounds odd to give chickens eggs, but eggs are such a good source of protein and vitamins that they're excellent for helping sick or weak chickens of any age. Make sure they're hard boiled, of course - that way there's no risk of eating raw eggs later - and for chicks, mash them into crumbles so that they can be easily digested.

Any chick also needs to have some grit if they're eating anything but chick feed. There's an article about feeding chicks here, including information about grit.

Hope that helps - good luck with the rest of your brood.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Questions and Answers.


If you enjoyed this article and found it helpful, I'd love you to let me know by clicking this button - thank you!


Thank you for sharing the chicken love! 

Link to Raising Happy Chickens home page.